How to find big discounts on niche cars

The model I tried was the CLS250 CDI and I truly wanted to like it. But the
2.1-litre turbodiesel makes it sound like a European airport taxi. The
interior doesn’t feel as well built as an Audi, and the single stalk for
indicators and windscreen wipers, not to mention the column gearshift are
irritating.

But the two biggest drawbacks to this latest CLS are that the current
squared-off model isn’t as handsome as its curvier predecessor. Plus, the
regular E-class estate is £13,000 cheaper and has a significantly bigger
boot.

I’m clearly not alone in thinking the CLS is overpriced for what it is.
Mercedes is discounting the shooting brake by 19 per cent, the saloon by 21
per cent. It’s not brilliant at holding its value, either. Over the first
three years of its life, assuming 12,000 miles a year, the CLS Shooting
Brake will lose exactly two thirds of its RRP. The B-Max isn’t much better,
losing 65 per cent of its new price.

It’s just as well you won’t be paying the RRP for either. Niche segments, it
seems, can prove a welcome thing for savvy car shoppers.

Ford B-Max review

Mercedes-Benz CLS Shooting Brake review